Short Answers to Hard Questions About the Opioid Crisis – The New York

Short Answers to Hard Questions About the Opioid Crisis

By JOSH KATZ UPDATED August 10, 2017

Answers any question

On Thursday, President Trump said he intended to declare the opioid crisis a national emergency, as previously recommended by his opioid commission.

With the death toll from drugs rising faster than ever, you might feel that you could use a little catching up. For a quick refresher, and more on the practical effects of a formal declaration of an emergency, here are answers to 12 critical questions.

How bad is it?

Drug overdoses are the leading cause of death for Americans under 50, and deaths are rising faster than ever, primarily because of opioids.

Overdoses killed more people last year than guns or car accidents, and are doing so at a pace faster than the H.I.V. epidemic at its peak. In 2015, roughly 2 percent of deaths — one in 50 — in the United States were drug-related.

Percentage of deaths classified as drug-related

Overdoses are merely the most visible and easily counted symptom of the problem. Over two million Americans are estimated to have a problem with opioids. According to the latest survey data, over 97 million people took prescription painkillers in 2015; of these, 12 million did so without being directed by a doctor.

What is an “opioid”?

That’s not really a helpful answer.

The first such drug, and the one from which the opioid receptors get their name, was opium. Opium, a narcotic obtained from a kind of poppy, has been used in human societies for thousands of years. From opium people derived a whole host of other drugs with similar properties: first morphine, then heroin, then prescription painkillers like Vicodin, Percocet and OxyContin. Opium along with all of these derivatives are collectively known as opiates.

Then there are a handful of compounds that act just like opiates but aren’t made from the plant. Opiates along with these synthetic drugs — chiefly methadone and fentanyl — are grouped together into the category of substances called opioids.

Opioid receptors regulate pain and the reward system in the human body. That makes opioids powerful painkillers, but also debilitatingly addictive.

So is this crisis about prescription painkillers or heroin?

The crisis has its roots in the overprescription of opioid painkillers, but since 2011 overdose deaths from prescription opioids have leveled off. Deaths from heroin and fentanyl, on the other hand, are rising fast. In several states where the drug crisis is particularly severe, including Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, fentanyl is now involved in over half of all overdose fatalities.

Drug overdose deaths involving .

While heroin and fentanyl are the primary killers now, experts agree that the epidemic will not stop without halting the flow of prescription opioids that got people hooked in the first place.

Show me one way the epidemic has changed.

The latest iteration of the opioid epidemic has been especially deadly among adults in their 20s and early 30s.

Distribution of drug deaths by age

In 2000, the most common age for drug deaths, including those not involving opioids, was around 40. This was the generation that first grew addicted to prescription opioids in large numbers — white people especially so. Now there’s evidence that the opioid epidemic is dividing into two waves, with a new group of younger drug users growing addicted to, and dying from, heroin or fentanyl rather than prescription pills.

Where is the worst of the problem?

There’s a lot of geographic variation in the rate of drug deaths, with the highest overdose rates clustered in Appalachia, the Rust Belt and New England.

Teasing out the reasons for the geographical differences is not easy. In certain places, the ways in which people use drugs could be more dangerous (you’re more likely to die from injecting heroin than you are from smoking it, for example).

But it’s clear that a significant portion of the variation in deaths, if not necessarily in use, is being driven by the appearance of fentanyl in the drug supply. Fentanyl, a highly potent opioid, affects heroin users and pill users both, the latter often falling victim to counterfeit pills that look like prescription painkillers.

So far, the white population has been hardest hit, but this is beginning to change. Several critics have been quick to point out that the country’s response was not nearly as public-health-oriented during the crack cocaine epidemic in the 1980s, which disproportionately affected African-Americans.

Why has this problem gotten so much worse in recent years?

Addiction to opioids goes back centuries, but the current crisis really starts in the 1980s. A handful of highly influential journal articles relaxed long-standing fears among doctors about prescribing opioids for chronic pain. The pharmaceutical industry took note, and in the mid-1990s began aggressively marketing drugs like OxyContin. This aggressive and at times fraudulent marketing, combined with a new focus on patient satisfaction and the elimination of pain, sharply increased the availability of pharmaceutical narcotics.

Pill mills began popping up around the country as communities were flooded with prescription opioids. Over the next decade, a growing number of people grew addicted to the drugs, whether from prescriptions or from taking them recreationally. For many, what started with pills evolved into a heroin addiction.

At the same time, the heroin market was changing. The price plummeted. Newly decentralized drug distribution networks pushed heroin and counterfeit pharmaceuticals into suburban and rural areas where they had never been. Everywhere the suppliers went, they found a ready and willing customer base, primed for addiction by decades of prescription opiate use.

Then in 2014, fentanyl began entering the drug supply in large amounts.

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